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Current Health News

School Nurse Day
Wednesday, May 9, 2018 is National School Nurse Day! We honor more than 95,000 school nurses in the United States who make a difference in the lives of children every day! The theme this year is School Nurses: Advocates for 21st Century Student Health. School nurses lead the way to advance health and support education by ensuring that students are safe, healthy, and ready to learn. Let’s celebrate our school nurses today and always! 

IMMUNIZATON INFORMATION:  UPDATES FOR 2018-19:
For the 2018-19 school year, 2 doses of Hepatitis A vaccine will be a requirement for  K - 4, 6, and 12th grades.  (This vaccine was required in K-3 for the current school year.)  Again next year, a booster dose of Meningococcal (MCV4) vaccine is required for 12th graders unless their 1st dose was given on or after the 16th birthday.  Vaccination against HPV and Meningococcal B are both recommended (NOT REQUIRED) for students in 12th grade.  See the information on Meningococcal Disease below and the list of required immunizations for all grade levels by clicking on the "Immunization Requirements" link to the right ->

MENINGOCOCCAL DISEASE AND VACCINE INFORMATION:
 
The State of Indiana requires that information regarding Meningococcal Disease and Vaccine be made available for parents of Indiana school-aged children at the beginning of each school year:       
CLICK HERE to link to this information.

SEASONAL FLU information

Influenza symptoms often include fever, body aches, sore throat, cough, headache, and fatigue.  (You do not have to experience all of these symptoms for it to be the flu).
Each year, an average of 20,000 children under the age of 5 are hospitalized because of flu-related complications.  Influenza causes more hospitalizations among young children than any other vaccine-preventable disease.
Flu vaccination is recommended for all children aged 6 months and older.

These everyday preventive actions can help
slow the spread of colds and flu:

  *  Stay home when you are sick
  *  Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw          the tissue away after use and wash your hands.  If a tissue is not   available,        cover your mouth and nose with your sleeve, not your hand.
  *  Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough  or            sneeze
  *  Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth.  Germs spread this way.
  *  Clean and disinfect frequently-touched surfaces often.
                                                                 --www.cdc.gov/flu/

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